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. >> and with all the science behind natural advantage, the results are truly amazing. it's real science that gives you natural beauty. in a clinical study, within eight weeks 100% of women saw a reduction in the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, a decrease in the appearance of pore size, and a decrease in the appearance of skin blotchiness. and we're not talking minimal results here. uneven skin tone was improved by an incredible 70%, and the appearance of visible lines and wrinkles was decreased by 50%. that's like seeing half your wrinkles simply seem to disappear. you can be your own age, but be the best that you can be. your skin glows and radiates a more-youthful suppleness, and you shine from within with natural confidence. you're aging naturally... and beautifully. >> i'm 44. >> i'm 61. >> i'm 40 years old. >> i'm 61 years old. >> i'm 71 years old. >> these women all look years younger than their actual age. so what's their secret? they use natural advantage-- one of the most powerful cosmeceutical anti-aging systems ever developed. so why is natural advantage so effective in making wo
you moving. ♪ feeling free. ♪ >>> sunday morning on "biocentury this week." science and the age of austerity. what will deep budget cults mean for n.i.h.? -- cuts mean for n.i.h.? watch "biocentury this week" ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ahh, i've been crawling around this desert all day. it's hot, my throat is dry. i need water! water! oh, thanks. let's go check out some more animals. we're here in the colorado desert with my friend liz, who's the animal curator at the living desert zoo and botanical gardens. and we've come across a really interesting and an easy animal to really approach in the desert, because they don't move very fast. and, liz, this is a california desert tortoise, right? liz: right. jarod: now, this particular desert tortoise, this is probably one of the most ultimately adapted animals of all. i mean, they've been around for millions of years. turtles and tortoises are -- i mean, there are so many adaptations, but this particular specie of desert tortoise has really adapted to kind of take it to the next level and really handle some extreme conditions. liz: yes. jar
the subjectivity out of it and you put science around it. so it gives you a benchmark for the products that you have. so when we start looking at that, what we did was we said okay, what are some other alternatives? how can we horne into this as -- honey into this -- hone into this aspect of this particular product. we looked at things from the food industry, for instance. when we did that we came up with the clean stem fluid which is sourced as you said entirely from the fluid industry. what that did by developing those right off the bat, we had two or three orders magnitude stepdown in the numbers. >> numbers of what? >> it's a relative ranking. if you look at one product just in round numbers, let's say it's got an 800, which is what we have been using, some are down to 300 this. >> in terms of what? >> the effects of health, safety and environmental standpoint. >> researching and developing the new recipes for fracking is very expensive. tens of millions of dollars i imagine. >> yes, sir. >> the company believes the existing process, the ones they have been using for years is safe. why is h
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